Swimming Energy Calculator

OttrLoggr: Energy Use Calculator

Swim Energy Usage

Distance
Time
:
RER
Stroke

RER Value Guide

Slow (0.7)
A1 band - warm-up, recovery, cool-down sets
Moderate (0.85)
A2 band - aerobic capacity sets
Intense (1.00)
A3 band - aerobic power, VO2max sets

Data Source: Zamparo P, Bonifazi M (2013). Bioenergetics of cycling sports activities in water.

Coded for Swimming Science by Cameron Yick

Freestyle data

Velocity
/s
Cost
kj/
Total Cost
kj
Calories
kcal
Carbs
g
Fat
g

Quick Food Reference

Bagel
48g Carbs
Apple
25g Carbs
Peanut Butter
16g (2 tablespoons) *

Team Termin

Velocity Meter/Video Telemetry is a system used to analyze swimmers technique that has been in development for more than 20 years that is now a service provided by companies such a TeamTermin Sports Performance. It provides stroke frequency/velocity video and graphs with objective measurements to swimmers to adjust their technique. Velocity Meter/Video Telemetry reveals a microscopic view of swimming technique that is measured at 1,000 data points a second of velocity telemetry in concert with synchronized digital video that uses 4 high resolution underwater cameras that are positioned down a 25 yard/meter pool.  This technology represents a new wave of tools for coaches that will hopefully eliminate some of the “belief based” methods of improving swimming technique. Objective measurements are few and far between in the swimming community as many coaches (even great coaches) solely use subjective information to make stroke correction and coaching tips. Most coaches only use time and stroke rate as objective measurements, but these two variables are often flawed (I heard Eddie Reese has .4 variability on his hand time!). Subjective opinions can work for the greats, but typically not the majority of coaches. Numerous coaches use the “trial and error” approach to correcting stroke technique and hopefully stumble upon the solution sooner than later. This system generates easy to follow graphs depicting inadequacies in one stroke, allowing one to pinpoint discrepancies in their stroke.


2009 World Championship Finalist Female Sprinter—The static image is from the start, underwater dolphin technique, and regular swimming for 20 meters. The black vertical line on the red velocity telemetry marks the position of instantaneous velocity that corresponds to the synchronized video during the stroke cycle. It is then possible to view the video down to frame by frame to examine how the changes in technique affect the velocity signature without guesswork.


I love the graphs depicted from the system, but I’m a swim nerd and enjoy any chart about swimming, hell I enjoy any graph with water even the charts depicting the amount of oil in the Gulf (last I heard it was 62,000 gallons a day!). The true question is will this system help one perform faster? Well, founded Budd Teamin (founder) led one study with division 1 collegiate swimmers who utilized the velocity meter system for four years and found they improved on average 8-10% compared to normal division 1 swimmers whom improve 1-3%. This study did not have a control group and having Budd leading the study is a bit of a confounding variable, but one can not deny the results as any coach knows an average of 8-10% improvement is pretty good (read the study here and build your own opinion, read hereThis exactness can be useful for prescribing drills and areas to concentrate during fatigue when most swimmer's flaws are exacerbated. The system also allows the swimmer to chart various swimming techniques on the same graph providing essential comparison between swimming styles.(Shown below) For example, one could swim head up (Clay Evans’ is convinced this style is superior) and head down and compare the stroke frequency/velocity of these two styles. This allows the swimmers to modify their stroke and graphically identify which technique is superior. These tools would be optimally incorporated at the beginning of the season while a swimmers stroke is pliable. From there swim meets can be used to tell if the stroke changes implemented created improvements, because time is the ultimate variable in swimming. Therefore, a proper analysis of the graphs is essential to determine weak points in a stroke and follow-up is not as important. Anyway, click here for more information to set up a meeting with Team Termin today.



Stroke Frequency/Velocity Graph – This graph is generated from the Velocity Meter/Video Telemetry testing and precisely defines the stroke rate/tempo (x-axis - bottom) and swimming time for one lap of a 25 yard pool (y-axis - vertical) for this swimmer. The solid blue line with the solid blue dots represents the swimmers “regular stroke technique. The graph above demonstrates how other stroke permutations can be instantly compared with the current stroke pattern (blue line) to reveal positive or negative differences, and a path for future improvement.


This in combination of video analysis is provided by Team Termin, great information! These charts are familiar to those who have competed at national competitions as most swimmers have this information provided at these meets. A stroke graph in conjunction with this race analysis provides objective technique feedback used during the race, and gives the coach a more precise method for adjusting race tactics between prelims and finals.
Dist
Breakout, (sec)
Breakout Dist, (meters)
Split
Cycles
Time
Tempo (C/Min)
DPC (M/C.)
Clean Swimming Velocity, (M/sec)
Turn Time (sec)
25
1.98
5.75 *
10.88
6.5 *
10.88
50.5
3.00
2.09
0.97
50
1.34
3.75 *
12.58
8 *
23.46
48.7
2.59
1.82
1.03
75
1.40
3.75 *
12.70
9 *
36.16
51.1
2.45
1.81
1.02
100
1.40
3.75 *
13.07
8.5 *
49.23
47.0
2.57
1.75
1.02
125
1.81
4.75 *
13.10
8 *
1:02.33
48.0
2.50
1.72
1.07
150
1.42
3.75 *
13.26
8.5 *
1:15.59
45.6
2.56
1.69
0.82
175
1.52
4 *
13.34
9 *
1:28.93
48.8
2.38
1.68
0.86
200
1.65
4.5 *
13.18
9 *
1:42.11
45.7
2.36
1.59
-

Totals
12.53
34

66.5




6.79

Has anyone used this service?  What did you think?

GJohn

Phelps'

Will the shiny suit discussion ever dissipate?  Maybe I'm contributing to the lingering, but this piece on Swim News irritated me. Phelps' quote "I've said this before and I'll say it again: It's really going to be interesting to see who can make the transition. It's going to show who is willing to put in more work, to be able to be in better physical shape. You're not going to be able to float as easy on top of the water. I just think it's going to be interesting to see some of the times you'll see this week." Most top athletes are working their asses off, only a few do not work hard, so to say that taking away the suits will show the athlete whom works the hardest is nonsense.  Don't call other swimmers lazy because they used and benefited more from a legal suit!  I do believe some body types benefited more from the tech suits, but some swimmers benefit from better coaching, practice facilities, nutrition, etc.  These variabilities make sports great and I still believe taking away the tech suits hindered the sport of swimming on multiple levels.  Phelps' later comment especially upsets me when the article later states "of late, the most successful Olympian of all time has chastised himself for being a little "lazy". His form is not what it should be and he admitted to having skipped too many moments of intensity in the water. Yet the drag of the years is wearing off now that race season and the summer are here: "I think I'm more motivated now than I have been all year. Not being where you want to be is frustrating. At the same time, I brought this on myself."  Well Mr. Phelps if your theory of the hardest working athletes will benefit the most the dismantle of tech suits, theoretically I don't think you should win a damn event this week, unfortunately the hardest working athlete doesn't always win, hence why I have you winning most of your races, but not all....

This was going to be in the weekly round-up, but it turned into a whole piece.  Anyway, the meet is starting good luck to all!

GJohn