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...every race depends on how fast the swimmer reacts. For analysis, we can break the start into two phases: reaction time and block time (the analysis will be almost identical...

...in the first split and speed-up in the second, 23.65s and 26.77s are advised. In my previous piece I have explained how to set-up the target time for a swim...

...Take Home Message: How to estimate the 8th qualifying time to go through from the semis to the final and set target times for the finalists at the men’s 100m...

...compare both swimmers in each split (fig 2). Over time we can see a trend for a slight improvement in the reaction time for MBG. With no surprise, the split...

...years, from world championships. A total of 1719 reaction times formed the basis of this investigation. These athletes were split into four groups: Round 1 athletes Round 2 athletes Semifinalists...

...from a database (www.swimrankings.net). Relay races were only considered if the swimmers lead off the relay. Reaction time, first lap split time, second lap split time and final time were...

...energy expenditure. Today my aim is different, hence we need a more comprehensive and accurate model.   The split times were retrieved from the official website (figure 1). It’s impressive...

...muscles (central adaptation) and an increased utilization of oxygen by the working muscles (peripheral adaptations). These changes are frequently considered editable by coaches in the same period of time, due...

...degree looking at the relationship between time-trial performance and competition performance in swimming using a number of different competition analysis methods. 2. You recently published an article comparing time trial...

...to a SCM World records is 40% to 50% Coaches should consider spending an appropriate amount of time practicing starts and turns according to its contribution to final race time....

   
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