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...Take Home Points on Swimming World Record Gender Differences Gender gap is more obvious in sprinting than long-distance or marathon swim Nowadays the gap is 11%, 8% and...

...athlete’s momentum forward, giving a free-falling feeling. This sensation is important for sprinting. Also, when an athlete holds their head in slight extension, the lumbar spine will slightly arch and...

"Some people don't have the guts for distance racing. The polite term for them is sprinters." -Unknown "The East Germans first used biomechanics. This meant that rather...

Background Stretching is common prior to athletic performance despite the common thought that stretching immediately prior to sprint exercise impairs performance. Many of these programs utilize hamstring and...

...too much: Sprinting stresses the nervous system more than high volume training. However, many teams sprint much more during taper, continually stressing the nervous system without providing adequate recovery time....

...sprinting Creatine phosphate system (CP) –The creatine phosphate system is the fastest acting energy system and is activated first in any type of physical activity. In a 50 free, this...

...they rely on their rotational strength to drive their legs. However, in sprinting (swimming or kicking with a board) the athlete must use less hip rotation to keep the body...

...and exercise progression there is no more risk of injury than overuse injuries secondary to pounding yardage. Moreover, injuries with sprinting are typically muscle strains which heal well with proper...

...Modern swimmers have embraced aggressive forms of dryland conditioning, such as running, jumping, and sprinting. With this trend, functional ankles become more important for dryland safety and performance....

...is vertical. However, in sprinting, you have vertical forces as well as horizontal forces. When the foot strikes the ground during maximum speed sprinting, at first the force is projected...

   
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