Open/Close Menu Integrating practical and scientific information for elite performance

...Take Home Points on Swimming and Building Muscle It is believed three mechanisms exist for muscle growth (mechanical tension, metabolic stress, and muscular damage). These three mechanisms influence...

...distance between the three points was measured in the standing and bent over position. The subjects were split into three groups:   1) Control. 2) Kinesiotape without tension (just laying...

...often overlooked way to classify exercise selection is based on tension and relaxation in swimming. Legendary strength coach Dan John in his book Easy Strength (along with Pavel Tsatsouline) divides...

...on the role of the neural tension and strength, could you please explain the study and the results? Over the last 15 or so years there has been a lot...

...muscles, joints and ligaments. These respond to pressure, stretch and tension and are key in initiating what is known as the ‘stretch/reflex’. You will probably be familiar with the stretch/reflex...

...females. “Dryland” is a broad label, and can mean everything from easy stretching to intense lifting. Nevertheless, given the frequent bone density problems of female aquatic athletes , it could...

...different strategies. Also consider that not all increases in muscle activity are good, yet for the plank muscle activity is good as a way to teach full body tension without...

...that the increased protraction caused by active or passive tension in the pectoralis minor may assist a swimmer to further “reach” before initiating his/her pulling or propulsion through the water....

...the test stopped. Here it is specifically: "By means of a dynamometer, the tension applied to the elastic rope was constantly monitored on the display. Continuous vocal feedback was provided...

...every 1-3 weeks to avoid overtraining/ adaptation to the exercises. Barbell weight is then mixed with band tension, as well as chain weight (commonly referred to as accommodated resistance), and...

   
     © SWIMMING SCIENCE

Follow us: