Shoulder Kinematics During Scapular Plane Abduction

Shoulder Kinematics During Scapular Plane Abduction

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Injuries, Latest&Greatest Leave a Comment

Shoulder impingement is the most common injury in swimming. Many factors contribute to shoulder impingement and one is inadequate space for clearance of the rotator cuff tendons during arm elevation. Previous studies have analyzed healthy shoulder range of motion with single-plane radiographs, but did not provide 3-D motion of the shoulder. Three-dimensional analyzes are necessary to understand the activity in …

Minimizing Central Motor Control Breakdown

Minimizing Central Motor Control Breakdown

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Latest&Greatest, Training Leave a Comment

Any repetitive task results in performance impairments over time. The cause of these decrements is typically considered physiologically induced. However, recent studies and exercise physiologist feel these impairments are influenced by the central nervous system. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is suggested to alter the excitation of the movement areas in the brain (corticomotor tracts). The limits of maximal voluntary rate …

Auditory feedback helps adapt to altered environment

Auditory feedback helps adapt to altered environment

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Competition, Dr. John Mullen, Latest&Greatest, Training Leave a Comment

Providing feedback during practice and competitions is common in all sports. Despite the difficulty of providing feedback during swimming, coaches and teammates commonly provide numerous visual and auditory cues. Sensory substitution is the skill of the nervous system to receive input from one sensory system and transmit this information to another sensory system. For example, in swimming the sensory system …

Resistance Exercise Load Does Not Determine Muscle Size

Resistance Exercise Load Does Not Determine Muscle Size

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Dryland, Latest&Greatest, Training Leave a Comment

It is commonly thought the more weight one lifts during resistance training, the greater increase in muscle size (hypertrophy) occurs. Unfortunately, there is minimal evidence suggesting these two conditions correlate. Moreover, the size of a muscle is not suggested to correlate with swimming success. Instead of a percent of maximum, the total volume of weight lifted is potentially a means …

Friday Interview: Dr. Mitch Lomax on Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue (IMF) in Swimming

Friday Interview: Dr. Mitch Lomax on Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue (IMF) in Swimming

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Latest&Greatest, Training 2 Comments

1. Please introduce yourself to the readers (how you started in the profession, education, credentials, expertise, etc)  I’m a Sport and Exercise Scientist and a Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Physiology at the University of Portsmouth, UK. I gained both my PhD (2007) and MSc (with distinction, 2001) from Brunel University, UK, and my BSc (Hon) from Luton University …

Comparing Sprint and Strength Training Methods|

Comparing Sprint and Strength Training Methods

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Competition, Dr. John Mullen, Latest&Greatest, Training Leave a Comment

Resistance training is a common mode in dry-land to enhance out of water strength. Despite the lack of correlation between out of water strength and in water strength, many programs have found anecdotal success with resistance training. This is likely due to poor methods correlating in water strength and poor resistance training programs. Moreover, most studies comparing resistance training have …

Neuromuscular Response to Pain and Exercise Induced Muscle Damage

Neuromuscular Response to Pain and Exercise Induced Muscle Damage

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Injuries, Latest&Greatest Leave a Comment

Muscle soreness and pain are common sensations following a bout of unfamiliar exercise. This is believed secondary to lengthening and damage of the muscle fibers resulting in inflammation. Moreover, this damage results in changes in neuromuscular function and force production. Surprisingly, this decrease in force is not seen until 12 hours following exercise, perhaps due to pain not occurring until …

HIT for Swimmers

HIT for Swimmers

Dr. GJohn Mullen Biomechanics, Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Training 1 Comment

If you follow SwimSwam or Swimming World Magazine you’ve certainly noticed the great interest in ultra-short race pace training (USRPT) and elite age-group professional swimmer Michael Andrew. Posts on these topics receive massive traffic and great controversy regarding training and many other topics. As written previously, here are the differences between the various forms of training: HIT: High-intensity training (HIT) involves performing …

Friday Interview: Do Backpacks Cause Shoulder Pain?

Friday Interview: Do Backpacks Cause Shoulder Pain?

Dr. GJohn Mullen Blog, Dr. John Mullen, Injuries Leave a Comment

Below is an interview on swimmers use of backpacks, specifically answering the question: Do backpacks cause shoulder pain? Here is the latest article by Yoram Epstein, Effect of Load Carriage on Upper Limb Performance. Review the latest studies and complete research work sites here. 1. What research exists on the question, do backpacks cause shoulder pain? What is a swimmer risk of using backpacks? The research …

How to Prevent Swimming Burnout

How to Prevent Swimming Burnout

admin Blog, Competition, Dr. John Mullen, Psychology Leave a Comment

Take Home Points on How to Prevent Swimming Burnout Physiological capacities are limited after maturation. Technique is the largest contributor of success, especially after maturation. Burnout is higher in women, potentially due to earlier development and longer period of plateauing.  Improvements in swimming naturally occur during maturation, in fact, one can expect 3 – 4% improvement during these years (Sweetenham 2013). …